Step-by-Step: Attach a Photo or Pic to a “Tweet This” URL

According to Buffer, tweets including images were retweeted 150% more than tweets without images. [Tweet This Image] Stat Source

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A glaring out-of-the-box feature that is missing for digital marketers and social media consultants using Twitter Intent or “Tweet This” functionality is the ability to embed an image to the share link. Twitter Cards are an option, but they only display the post image and copy when someone views the tweet. We figured out how to embed images in Tweet This links a few months ago and thought we would share the step-by-step process.

Step 1: Create a Twitter Shareable Image in Standard Dimensions

Use Canva or Adobe Creative Cloud to create an image you would like to be shared in the Tweet This link in the following dimensions: 1024×512 pixels. These dimensions aren’t required, but they are the best dimensions for Twitter. Here is the sample image we are using for this tutorial:

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Step 2: Write the Tweet Copy & Share on Twitter

Unfortunately, to get the image link that you need to embed in your shared tweet, you first have to share a tweet with the image on any Twitter account.

So the next step is to create the copy, including links to landing pages and hashtags — keeping in mind the total 140 character limit. To be safe and account for the characters that will be added with the image link, you want to create a tweet that is no more than 90 characters.

Then share your original tweet in the standard tweet post editor on Twitter. You can include the URLs and hashtags if you’d like, but it is not necessary to get the image link we will embed. The minimal requirement is that you share the image. twitter-post-editor.png

Here is the original tweet we created in our client’s account:

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Step 3: Copy the Image Link from the Twitter Post Embed Code

Now that we have an original live tweet, the image lives on the Twitter server with its own dedicated URL. There are two links on the twitter server for all shared images — one is on the pic.twitter.com subdomain and the other lives on the pbs.twimg.com subdomain. The former is the only one that we can use to generate an embedded image in the Tweet This link: pic.twitter.com.

When a tweet is shared that includes a pic.twitter.com link, Twitter will automatically pull and attach the linked image and display it as a full image instead of a link.

If you just right-click on the image and select ‘Copy image URL’ you will get the pbs.twimg.com image link which WILL NOT WORK. Do not use that link!

To get the pic.twitter.com link, we need to go to the twitter timeline and click on the original tweet we created, which will bring it up in lightbox format like this:

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Do not delete the original tweet after you grab the image or you will delete the image link as well!

Next, we want to click the More menu that appears as three dots (or an ellipsis mark) to display a drop-down from which we can select the Embed Tweet option.

That option will display this:

embed-code-tweet-include-media

Copy that code into a text editor to allow you to select only the pic.twitter.com link for the image from the embed code.

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Step 4: Use a Twitter Intent Generator to Create the Tweet This link

Now we have everything we need to create a Twitter Intent or Tweet This link. We like to use CYMI Technology’s Twitter Intent Creator to generate the link.

Fill in the Tweet Text and paste the image URL in the URL field in the Generator form.

It is imperative that you precede the pic.twitter.com link you are pasting into the generator with http:// to ensure that Twitter recognizes it.

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Click the Generate button and then highlight and copy the full Twitter Intent URL.

Step 6: Test the Tweet This or Twitter Intent Link

Paste the copied URL that was generated by the Twitter Intent Creator into your Browser URL bar and hit enter. It’s important that you don’t copy any additional characters or blank spaces when you select and copy the URL.

You should see something like this:

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Click the Tweet button to test the share, if you’d like.

That’s it! You’re done. To let your readers know that they can share your image in a tweet, we recommend adding a “Tweet This Image” text link in the image caption in your article and hyperlinking the image to the generated Twitter Intent URL as well.

Wrap-Up: Twitter Tips and Hacks

We hope this tutorial on how to embed an image with Twitter Intent helps you add a new tool to your content marketing toolbox. What are some other hacks you use? What are some other tasks you struggle with on Twitter?

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